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How Online Learning Companies Are Using the Pandemic to Take Over Classroom Teaching

School Magazine |

Opening schools during a pandemic in an underfunded urban district like Providence, Rhode Island, where buildings are in miserable physical conditions, is already a huge undertaking, but the situation is made worse when district leaders bring in private contractors who know nothing about the community and make no effort to collaborate with public school teachers.

As school districts across the nation faced the daunting task of opening the new school year with online learning or a blend of online and in-person, many contracted the work to private companies, and there’s widespread evidence these arrangements are rush jobs that give teachers and parents no say in the adoption process as taxpayer funds are wasted on products of questionable quality.

Article focuses on concerns with Edgenuity and its parent companies in districts across the United States. Produced by Independent Media Institute’s Our Schools.

“With the pandemic, districts have struggled and made hasty decisions, and some have been enticed by the promises of the established online providers,” writes Gary Miron, a professor of evaluation, measurement, and research at Western Michigan University, in an email. “These companies can say all kinds of things about their awesome platforms and curricula, but the evidence shows that students [who use the platforms] fail, and taxpayers are ripped off.