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  • The 74 Million | District CEO Eric Gordon said he and his staff are debating limiting in-person learning to elementary students and those with special needs if schools are able to shift Nov. 9 to a “hybrid” plan — a mix of in-person and online classes. Whether any in-person classes resume, or if lessons remain online for the second quarter of the school year, depends on the city and county’s COVID-19 case counts over the next few weeks. High school students would keep taking classes online under that plan, which is similar to how districts in the Chicago, San Antonio...
  • CityBeat | Personal finance website WalletHub (aka the curator of many rankings and reports unrelated to finance) has named Ohio one of America's top 10 safest states for schools to reopen.  Metrics involved in the ranking system included two main categories: risk of COVID-19 infection and health and financial infrastructure. Each contained 15 subsections related to their category including child COVID-19 cases per 100,000 children; public mask usage; average public school class size; share of children living in crowded housing; comprehensive school reopening guidance and student-to-school-nurse ratio. Ohio came in at No. 7, just after Rhode Island at No. 6...
  • Cincinnati Business Journal | A new study indicates dozens of campuses won't even consider standardized test scores if they are submitted. That's putting a billion-dollar industry on notice. The findings come from the National Center for Fair & Open Testing, a Massachusetts-based nonprofit, which identified 60 college campuses that as of this month have either temporarily or permanently gone "test blind" in evaluating student applicants. The organization, which operates as FairTest, said another 1,600 accredited, four-year schools have gone test-optional for the fall 2021 semester. Colleges including the University of California system refuse to accept SAT and ACT scoresCincinnati Business...
  • PBS News Hour | Parents, students, teachers and school board members from across the country talk about what the first month or so has been like for them. Video runs about 10 minutes. Transcript available as well. How schools are coping with constantly changing landscape of COVID-19More at PBS
  • Education Dive | In separate documents released Monday, the U.S. Department of Education reminded schools of their obligations to special education services and civil rights laws regardless of whether students are learning in-person or remotely. (more…)
  • Ohio Department of Education Awards Purple Star Schools for Demonstrating Commitment to Military Families. via Ohio Department of Education. State Superintendent of Public Instruction Paolo DeMaria today announced that 37 Ohio schools will receive the Purple Star Award this school year. The award recognizes a school’s demonstrated commitment to serving students and families connected to the United States armed forces and Ohio National Guard.

  • WCPO | "Kailee is everything that we want our student-athletes to be," Oak Hills athletic director Ben Hageman said. "Her dedication to the classroom in addition to being a four-sport athlete takes incredible dedication and commitment." Oak Hills sophomore Kailee Hebert is a winner on and off the fieldOak Hills sophomore Kailee Hebert is a kicker on the football team, plays soccer and participates in travel softball this fall. She’s also an Oak Hills basketball player in the winter.
  • Journal-News | Mike Holbrook, superintendent told the board, the problems with the contractor-supplied computer program are being addressed but in hindsight the supplier “over-promised and under delivered.” “There was a general misunderstanding of what VLI was,” said Rick Pate, executive director of secondary programs. “Many families thought it would be what it (at home learning) was last (school) year,” after all Ohio K-12 schools were ordered closed, he said. “Some families thought it (VLI) would be an easier route,” said Pate. But, he added, the VLI program “requires a significant parent involvement” of three to four hours a day, especially...
  • CNE | Hear what is happening with the Comprehensive State Literacy Development at the High School with principal TJ Glassmeyer. Amy Ellis and Tonya Schmidt discuss the impact at the elementary level. https://anchor.fm/s/fc0b05c/podcast/play/19942292/https%3A%2F%2Fd3ctxlq1ktw2nl.cloudfront.net%2Fstaging%2F2020-09-21%2F2405a8117ef65e539ed16983dae0314f.m4a State grants position CNE to be a leader in literacyCNE | Clermont Northeastern will receive $1,575,000 over four years – $1,050,000 for the elementary school and $525,000 for the high school – from the Comprehensive Literacy State Development Grant program.
  • NPR | At least 166 instructors represented by Little Rock Education Association say they are concerned about COVID-19 and only willing to teach remotely. Until the district allows for remote-only instruction or increases school safety, they say they will stay home, according to a union statement. "Our schools are NOT safe. Someone is going to get sick and someone is going to die if we continue in the current manner," association President Teresa Knapp Gordon said in a statement. "This is not a strike," Gordon continued. "We are completely and totally willing to work and serve our students virtually in...
  • WLWT and WCPO | It appears a majority of public schools in Boone, Campbell and Kenton counties are using a blended A/B model to bring students back to class, meaning students spend alternate days at their home school based on their last name. But there are grade levels going back five days a week. It all depends on how much space a particular building has to accommodate students who want to be back in the classroom. Northern Ky students return to classMore at WLWT Blended learning in Boone Co SchoolsMore at WCPO
  • Dayton Daily News | A small number of Dayton Public Schools high school students in certain career-tech and arts classes would begin limited in-person work starting this Thursday. If that goes well, a second group, including English as a second language students and special education students in self-contained classrooms, would return Oct. 15. Then starting Nov. 9, the vast majority of students would be on a hybrid plan where they attend school in-person two days per week and continue working remotely the other days. “I just really believe we need to starting seeing our kids face-to-face,” Superintendent Elizabeth Lolli told...
  • Toledo Blade | Some 152 students and five staff members have been quarantined after three students tested positive for coronavirus in the Perrysburg School District on Friday. The incident marks the third positive case to appear in a Perrysburg elementary school in the six weeks since the district returned to the classroom. The district has over 5,700 students. Over 150 quarantined after positive virus tests in Perryburg SchoolsMore at the Toledo Blade
  • Columbus Dispatch | The Gahanna-Jefferson school district hopes to receive enough "yes" votes on a three-pronged tax request on Nov. 3 to build a new high school, expand several other buildings and bolster its operating budget. Those leading a committee in support of Issue 22 say that waiting isn't an option. The total 10.69 mills sought would cost school district residents an additional $374 per year for every $100,000 in assessed property value. It's expected that 800 additional students will move into the district by 2025, and numbers will continue rising due to home construction in the area, according to...
  • Toledo Blade A lawsuit challenging the state of Ohio’s insistence upon mask-wearing in K-12 schools this academic year has been moved to Franklin County Common Pleas Court against the objections of those who filed it. The case was originally filed Sept. 9 in Putnam County Common Pleas Court because of extenuating circumstances involving one of the parents named in it. Judge agrees to change of venue in school mask lawsuitMore at the Toledo Blade The lawsuit was filed against interim Ohio Department of Health Director Lance Himes. It claims his statewide directive infringed upon the constitutional rights of the plaintiffs,...
  • Education Dive | The tech would allow students to receive instructional content in remote areas without internet and comes encrypted for data security. Datacasting, or data broadcasting, has been used for years in the public safety sector, helping first responders prepare for natural disasters, search and rescue missions and school safety operations. Now, the concept is being repurposed to provide rural students who don't have reliable access to the internet with remote learning opportunities. States invest in datacasting to bridge the K-12 digital divideMore at Education Dive (more…)
  • Ohio Capital Journal | Members of the U.S. Senate are pushing for $4 billion in the next coronavirus relief package to help students in rural and low-income areas gain access to high speed internet. Senate Democrats sent a letter to FCC Chairman Ajit Pai last week urging the agency to allow broadband connection into students’ homes by expanding the E-Rate Program, which helps schools and libraries connect to the internet. Sen. Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.) argued that the FCC has the ability to expand the program without permission from Congress. “The consequences are dire,” Van Hollen told Maryland Matters. “I...
  • Education Week and The 74 Million | Amy Coney Barrett, President Trump’s pick to replace the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the Supreme Court currently serves on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 7th Circuit. During her time on the 7th Circuit, Barrett has joined opinions involving public school bus transportation for private schools, the exemption from anti-discrimination laws for religious school teachers, free speech for a school administrator, special education, and discrimination under Title IX. (more…)
  • GCF | Established in June with a commitment of $5 million over five years, the goal of the Racial Justice Fund is to advance matters of fairness and justice with a focus on the systems that affect the Black community, specifically criminal, economic and social justice. More broadly, the fund seeks to address the root causes of systemic racism through policy change.  More at the Greater Cincinnati Foundation.
  • WWCS | The levy would generate $3.2 million annually for operating expenses related to educational programs. This is the first Winton Woods levy placed on the ballot in over 10 years that requests additional funding.  “This levy will fund instructional services, ongoing educational and extracurricular opportunities for all students,” said Superintendent Anthony G. Smith. “In addition, it will provide funding for key identified areas of need including the Preschool Village, increased enrollment and additional school resource officers.” More at Winton Woods City Schools.